Laminitis Prone

Management of the lamintis prone horse should focus on a low iron, low sugar, high fibre diet matched to the vitamins and minerals in grass, hay or haylage.

Support and manage laminitis prone horses

In addition laminitis prone horses should have the correct diagnosis,  correct hoof care/trimming and suitable exercise. Without attention to these aspects then it can be difficult to manage these laminitis prone horses.

Many horses are laminitis prone. They may have been identified as EMS, IR or PPID. These horses or ponies are often prone to laminitis and the health of their metabolism plays a crucial role in this.

Careful attention to diet is crucial to both manage weight and nutritional availability. Many laminitis prone horses and ponies end up on a starvation diet to control calorie levels.

The trouble is that in controlling and reducing calories other nutrients vital for health and correct metabolic function are also reduced. In this situation a vicious cycling ensues where the maintenance of a healthy metabolic system is compromised due to a shortage of key nutrients such as protein, minerals and vitamins.

In addition where hay is soaked, often for over 12 hours, this results in many water soluble nutrients being leached and therefore tipped down the drain.

All owners with laminitis prone horses should use a careful approach of feed in a diet which is below 10% combined ESC sugar and starch.  They should try to either test hay or haylage or matched nutrients needed to be supplemented to that commonly found in grass, hay or haylage.

Forageplus can offer each laminitis prone horse the right metabolic support and aims to help horse owners achieve no laminitis by correct management and feeding.

Read more about how laminitis prone horses are affected by levels of nutrients in the grass and hay they eat

Using Forageplus – How much will it cost to feed a forage focused horse feed balancer or bespoke supplement?

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